Author Topic: Biggio's Speech  (Read 9602 times)

Texifornia

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Biggio's Speech
« on: July 26, 2015, 01:54:51 pm »
Craig Biggio's speech was, unsurprisingly, a lead off home run.

One of, if not the best, acceptance speeches I've ever heard.
« Last Edit: July 26, 2015, 01:59:58 pm by Texifornia »
He breezed him, one more time!

Bench

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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2015, 01:58:51 pm »
It was perfect.


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Ty in Tampa

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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #2 on: July 26, 2015, 02:00:25 pm »
Agreed. Quite the man, that Biggio.
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Greg M

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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2015, 02:22:32 pm »
Missed it.  Any streams up yet?

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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #4 on: July 26, 2015, 02:27:45 pm »
Missed it.  Any streams up yet?

I see the MLB network is replaying it at 8 tonight.

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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #5 on: July 26, 2015, 02:47:41 pm »
It's on MLB at bat


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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #6 on: July 26, 2015, 02:58:17 pm »
I see the MLB network is replaying it at 8 tonight.

Here ya go.
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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #7 on: July 26, 2015, 03:16:55 pm »
Awesome.  Thanks guys.

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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #8 on: July 26, 2015, 03:20:07 pm »
Class.
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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #9 on: July 27, 2015, 09:24:28 am »
I was slightly surprised he didn't lobby a little for Bagwell, but otherwise, note-perfect.
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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #10 on: July 27, 2015, 09:37:36 am »
I was slightly surprised he didn't lobby a little for Bagwell, but otherwise, note-perfect.

Me too.  I wondered if they are told not to.
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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #11 on: July 27, 2015, 10:16:25 am »
Me too.  I wondered if they are told not to.

I agree with everyone here that his speech was awesome.  Makes me proud to be a fan.

Also, maybe I've got the wrong impression, but I always thought Biggio and Bagwell weren't as close personally as one would expect considering they played side by side for 15 years at hall of fame levels.  They always seemed to have a closer relationship with Cammy than each other.

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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #12 on: July 27, 2015, 10:45:22 am »
Biggio was talking Bagwell up on Saturday, so maybe that's what he (and the Astros/MLB PR people) decided to do.

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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #13 on: July 27, 2015, 11:05:26 am »
Me too.  I wondered if they are told not to.

Or if not I can easily see Craig feeling it wouldn't be appropriate. 
« Last Edit: July 27, 2015, 11:48:29 am by Bench »
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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #14 on: July 27, 2015, 11:41:47 am »
Or if not I can easily see Craig feeling it's wouldn't be appropriate. 

I also don't think Bagwell would want him to do that.
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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #15 on: July 27, 2015, 11:48:35 am »
I also don't think Bagwell would want him to do that.

I wouldn't want him to do that.  It shouldn't be a platform to campaign for other players.  Nothing would turn me off more than to hear someone tell us why he thinks Barry Bond or Roger Clemens or Pete Rose should be in.
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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #16 on: July 27, 2015, 12:01:01 pm »
Or if not I can easily see Craig feeling it wouldn't be appropriate.

Unlike, say, Joe Morgan.
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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #17 on: July 27, 2015, 12:59:57 pm »
Unlike, say, Joe Morgan.

But he's ah, Lil Joe....
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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #18 on: July 27, 2015, 01:25:31 pm »

I wouldn't want him to do that.  It shouldn't be a platform to campaign for other players.  Nothing would turn me off more than to hear someone tell us why he thinks Barry Bond or Roger Clemens or Pete Rose should be in.

I agree with not campaigning on behalf of other players, though I certainly think it's highly appropriate to use the podium to stump for causes and issues that are important to you.  I thought Smoltz's discussion of teen-age Tommy John patients, kids throwing only competitive pitches rather than building arm strength playing catch, and the importance of not specializing in a sport at the age of 13 was entirely appropriate.  Likewise, I think the NFL players going into the HOF this year should spend a significant amount time talking about Junior Seau and why nobody is allowed to speak on his behalf at the induction ceremony. 
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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #19 on: July 27, 2015, 03:01:51 pm »
I liked that Biggio recognized so many behind-the-scenes people who helped him along the way. I got a little teary-eyed when he was thanking Matt Galante.

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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #20 on: July 27, 2015, 03:04:30 pm »
From what I was told (third party, so...) the players are "strongly encouraged" to not do anything to question the writer's votes on that podium.  It would have been okay to mention someone like Ken Griffey, Jr (like Johnson did yesterday) because he hasn't been eligible yet. But campaigning for someone who has been eligible but has not been elected is verbotten. (Joe Morgan notwithstanding.)

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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #21 on: July 27, 2015, 03:13:40 pm »
I agree with not campaigning on behalf of other players, though I certainly think it's highly appropriate to use the podium to stump for causes and issues that are important to you.  I thought Smoltz's discussion of teen-age Tommy John patients, kids throwing only competitive pitches rather than building arm strength playing catch, and the importance of not specializing in a sport at the age of 13 was entirely appropriate.  Likewise, I think the NFL players going into the HOF this year should spend a significant amount time talking about Junior Seau and why nobody is allowed to speak on his behalf at the induction ceremony.

I loved Smoltz going after year round baseball. It is stupid and destructive.
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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #22 on: July 27, 2015, 03:16:31 pm »
I loved Smoltz going after year round baseball. It is stupid and destructive.

Agreed.  I could hear the cretins at Baseball USA crying from my living room...

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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #23 on: July 27, 2015, 03:40:27 pm »
I liked that Biggio recognized so many behind-the-scenes people who helped him along the way. I got a little teary-eyed when he was thanking Matt Galante.

So did Matt Galante. Great gesture by Craig.

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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #24 on: July 27, 2015, 04:09:29 pm »
I agree with not campaigning on behalf of other players, though I certainly think it's highly appropriate to use the podium to stump for causes and issues that are important to you.  I thought Smoltz's discussion of teen-age Tommy John patients, kids throwing only competitive pitches rather than building arm strength playing catch, and the importance of not specializing in a sport at the age of 13 was entirely appropriate.  Likewise, I think the NFL players going into the HOF this year should spend a significant amount time talking about Junior Seau and why nobody is allowed to speak on his behalf at the induction ceremony.

I think it's fine for players to talk about certain things that influenced them, like Biggio mentioning the Sunshine Kids, or Smoltz talking about the the things that make kids better athletes, or even acknowledging a former teammate like Smoltz did with Alan Trammell. It's another though to question why somebody has not made it, no matter how sincere.  I'd also hate to see a player ramble on about his views on gay marriage or gun control or illegal immigration or how much they hate the current President, no matter how strongly they feel its important.
The rules of distinction were thrown out with the baseball cap.  It does not lend itself to protocol.  It is found today on youth in homes, classrooms, even in fine restaurants.  Regardless of its other consequences, this is a breach against civility.  A civilized man should avoid this mania.

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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #25 on: July 27, 2015, 05:01:30 pm »
I loved the speech. Classic Biggio.   

2 things I noticed --

1) I cringed every time an announcer or spokesperson (including the great Gary Thorne) mispronounced his last name, especially that MLB Network host Greg Amsinger who practically just said the three letters B G O.   It's not Bee, it's Bih.  Closer to Bidge-E-O than anything else.  The only non-Astros affiliated person that got it right was the keeper of the Hall lady.    The Ausmus and Milo clips got it right, but the MLB Network guys ignored those "stupid" people.

2)  While Ausmus would have been in my top 2, I was slightly surprised Bagwell didn't do the introduction, considering how linked they were in their careers.   I wonder if they asked Jeff, but he yielded to Mr. Ivy League for superior eloquence.    BA nailed it.
« Last Edit: July 27, 2015, 05:04:21 pm by ValpoCory »

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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #26 on: July 27, 2015, 05:29:13 pm »
I think it's fine for players to talk about certain things that influenced them, like Biggio mentioning the Sunshine Kids, or Smoltz talking about the the things that make kids better athletes, or even acknowledging a former teammate like Smoltz did with Alan Trammell. It's another though to question why somebody has not made it, no matter how sincere.  I'd also hate to see a player ramble on about his views on gay marriage or gun control or illegal immigration or how much they hate the current President, no matter how strongly they feel its important.

Well, yeah.  It's not a general bully pulpit, but if it's relevant to the proceedings (and not lobbying for their buddies, though Smoltz did just assume Chipper would make it) then it's fair game.  Which Smoltz's comments about  youth baseball were and what one of the NFL players comments about Seau would be.
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HudsonHawk

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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #27 on: July 27, 2015, 06:09:26 pm »
Well, yeah.  It's not a general bully pulpit, but if it's relevant to the proceedings (and not lobbying for their buddies, though Smoltz did just assume Chipper would make it) then it's fair game.  Which Smoltz's comments about  youth baseball were and what one of the NFL players comments about Seau would be.

"Relevant to the proceedings" is a far cry from "stumping for issues that are important to you".  I think we basically agree on what is appropriate and what is not, but I guess I think the slope is slippery...er...than you do. 
The rules of distinction were thrown out with the baseball cap.  It does not lend itself to protocol.  It is found today on youth in homes, classrooms, even in fine restaurants.  Regardless of its other consequences, this is a breach against civility.  A civilized man should avoid this mania.

Ty in Tampa

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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #28 on: July 27, 2015, 07:43:11 pm »

I wouldn't want him to do that.  It shouldn't be a platform to campaign for other players.  Nothing would turn me off more than to hear someone tell us why he thinks Barry Bond or Roger Clemens or Pete Rose should be in.

Craig did mention Bags in the roundtable today when asked directly by Gammons whether there as anyone they would like to see make the Hall.

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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #29 on: July 27, 2015, 08:46:14 pm »
Craig did mention Bags in the roundtable today when asked directly by Gammons whether there as anyone they would like to see make the Hall.

Gammons has been one of Bagwell's supporters for the Hall outside of Houston, so there was likely some intention behind the question.

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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #30 on: July 28, 2015, 05:17:53 am »
I loved Smoltz going after year round baseball. It is stupid and destructive.

+1,000
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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #31 on: July 28, 2015, 08:02:48 am »

I wouldn't want him to do that.  It shouldn't be a platform to campaign for other players.  Nothing would turn me off more than to hear someone tell us why he thinks Barry Bond or Roger Clemens or Pete Rose should be in.

What is the line between a public grievance and a courageous stance? I ask because the most consequential Hall of Fame speech was given by Ted Williams, who (among other things), said this:

"I hope that one day Satchel Paige and Josh Gibson will be voted into the Hall of Fame as symbols of the great Negro players who are not here only because they weren’t given the chance."

Not long thereafter, they were inducted and it's doubtful it would have happened without Williams' advocacy.
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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #32 on: July 28, 2015, 09:16:35 am »
What is the line between a public grievance and a courageous stance? I ask because the most consequential Hall of Fame speech was given by Ted Williams, who (among other things), said this:

"I hope that one day Satchel Paige and Josh Gibson will be voted into the Hall of Fame as symbols of the great Negro players who are not here only because they weren’t given the chance."

Not long thereafter, they were inducted and it's doubtful it would have happened without Williams' advocacy.

That is the fine line that is easy to cross.  Again, I think we all agree that there are relevant issues that can be and should be addressed.  But then there's droning on about "I think he's a HOFer because I saw him play everyday..." with every teammate...and I *think* we all agree it shouldn't be a platform to campaign for your favorite Presidential candidate or explain why homosexuality is a choice and you're all going to hell and will feel God's wrath or why women and negroes shouldn't be allowed to vote.  There are two sides to every issue, and if you allow one, you have to be willing to allow the other.  I just think an inductee's remarks should be more measured than simply stumping for whatever stirs his emotions. 
The rules of distinction were thrown out with the baseball cap.  It does not lend itself to protocol.  It is found today on youth in homes, classrooms, even in fine restaurants.  Regardless of its other consequences, this is a breach against civility.  A civilized man should avoid this mania.

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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #33 on: July 28, 2015, 10:00:03 am »
What is the line between a public grievance and a courageous stance? I ask because the most consequential Hall of Fame speech was given by Ted Williams, who (among other things), said this:

"I hope that one day Satchel Paige and Josh Gibson will be voted into the Hall of Fame as symbols of the great Negro players who are not here only because they weren’t given the chance."

Not long thereafter, they were inducted and it's doubtful it would have happened without Williams' advocacy.

In my mind that is addressing an important institutional change within the sport and discussing it in the setting of a HOF induction is entirely fitting and appropriate.  That goes in the same subject as NFLers addressing CTE and related brain damage that the NFL is unwilling to meet head on even as it inducts a man who took his life because of it and, to a much lesser extent, Smoltz's comments on youth baseball.  The key is the "symbols of the great Negro players who are not here only because they weren’t given the chance" as opposed to just stumping for a teammate who you think ought to be in because you know him. 
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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #34 on: July 28, 2015, 10:26:09 am »
unwilling to meet head on

too soon
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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #35 on: July 28, 2015, 10:57:17 am »
too soon

Pun most definitely intended.
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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #36 on: July 28, 2015, 01:05:47 pm »
So did Matt Galante. Great gesture by Craig.

There were several times during his speech that I misted up a little.  In addition to his tribute to Matt Galante, the references to Ken Caminiti and Darryl Kile also got to me a little.  Those four - Bigio, Bags, Caminiti and Kile, were building blocks for the success that the Astros saw in the 90's.  Pple always include Lance Berkman as well, but if I recall correctly, he came along a couple of years later still. 

Not a part of Biggio's speech, but I was glad to hear the commissioner speak of his initiative to bring emphasis to baseball in our youth today.  It just astounds me that more and more kids are choosing a different sport to play.  When I was growing up in the 60's, EVERYBODY played baseball (well, at least every BOY), and we played it all the time.  Every day after school, all the guys in my neighborhood were at a vacant lot on the net block.  My dad - who had played baseball during WWII with Hank Greenberg - actually paid to have the lot cleared and leveled so we could actually set up a diamond.  We were out there everyday, even in the snow in December one time.  We'd take a "7th-inning stretch" for dinner, then come back out and play until it was too dark to see.  It was just like "The Sandlot", except with a wider age range.  I played all the way up until HS, and even occasionally after. 

When I heard Biggio speak Sunday, I was reminded of that.  Every one of us played for one reason - because we loved it.  And as I said, it just astounds me that most kids just don't feel that way anymore.

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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #37 on: July 28, 2015, 06:26:31 pm »
There were several times during his speech that I misted up a little.  In addition to his tribute to Matt Galante, the references to Ken Caminiti and Darryl Kile also got to me a little.  Those four - Bigio, Bags, Caminiti and Kile, were building blocks for the success that the Astros saw in the 90's.  Pple always include Lance Berkman as well, but if I recall correctly, he came along a couple of years later still. 

Not a part of Biggio's speech, but I was glad to hear the commissioner speak of his initiative to bring emphasis to baseball in our youth today.  It just astounds me that more and more kids are choosing a different sport to play.  When I was growing up in the 60's, EVERYBODY played baseball (well, at least every BOY), and we played it all the time.  Every day after school, all the guys in my neighborhood were at a vacant lot on the net block.  My dad - who had played baseball during WWII with Hank Greenberg - actually paid to have the lot cleared and leveled so we could actually set up a diamond.  We were out there everyday, even in the snow in December one time.  We'd take a "7th-inning stretch" for dinner, then come back out and play until it was too dark to see.  It was just like "The Sandlot", except with a wider age range.  I played all the way up until HS, and even occasionally after. 

When I heard Biggio speak Sunday, I was reminded of that.  Every one of us played for one reason - because we loved it.  And as I said, it just astounds me that most kids just don't feel that way anymore.

I know what you mean. It makes me sad, actually. I was out every day after school and all day in the summer playing something. Usually bare-footed. Kids today just don't seem to go "play". Too much electronic shit.

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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #38 on: July 29, 2015, 07:08:53 am »
I know what you mean. It makes me sad, actually. I was out every day after school and all day in the summer playing something. Usually bare-footed. Kids today just don't seem to go "play". Too much electronic shit.

+1
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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #39 on: July 29, 2015, 07:52:23 am »
I know what you mean. It makes me sad, actually. I was out every day after school and all day in the summer playing something. Usually bare-footed. Kids today just don't seem to go "play". Too much electronic shit.

There's also fear for kids' safety that didn't exist for us.  You just don't send kids out unsupervised any more.
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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #40 on: July 29, 2015, 08:27:54 am »
There's also fear for kids' safety that didn't exist for us.  You just don't send kids out unsupervised any more.

Even when it's based on nothing more than a 24-hour news cycle.

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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #41 on: July 29, 2015, 08:52:06 am »
There's also fear for kids' safety that didn't exist for us.  You just don't send kids out unsupervised any more.

Yes, there is that. That also makes me sad.

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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #42 on: July 29, 2015, 01:48:51 pm »
Even when it's based on nothing more than a 24-hour news cycle.

I think about this constantly.  Are things worse now or just more publicized?
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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #43 on: July 29, 2015, 01:58:36 pm »
I think about this constantly.  Are things worse now or just more publicized?

I think of things that have become part of the national experience, like the inspection of Halloween Candy, up to and including utilization of an x-ray machine.  There are 2 documented cases of tampering with Halloween candy, and both were perpetrated by family members of the intended victims.

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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #44 on: July 29, 2015, 02:06:23 pm »
I think about this constantly.  Are things worse now or just more publicized?

B.  This is pervasive in many industries and disciplines.  Reporting of weather events is a perfect example and it creates real and tangible issues for organizations (like state & local emergency managers and first responders) to effectively perform their mission.  And, when briefed on these risks, the media responds with a resounding "don't care".
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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #45 on: July 29, 2015, 02:31:58 pm »
I think about this constantly.  Are things worse now or just more publicized?

I actually think things are better and safer in general now.
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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #46 on: July 29, 2015, 02:34:19 pm »
I think of things that have become part of the national experience, like the inspection of Halloween Candy, up to and including utilization of an x-ray machine.  There are 2 documented cases of tampering with Halloween candy, and both were perpetrated by family members of the intended victims.

People actually inspect each piece of candy?  I thought that was an urban myth, like not flicking your lights at drivers without headlights on because their aspiring gang members looking for their first kill. 
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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #47 on: July 29, 2015, 03:44:50 pm »
I actually think things are better and safer in general now.

Just heard some guy on the radio who did a study of kids' independence about 40 years ago then followed up to see how the next generation of those same kids were treated. Guy said the town was largely unchanged and, if anything, safer than before. Kids free range was reduced significantly despite no increase in risk.

Miles of free reign for teenagers was reduced to blocks. Blocks of free range for 5-7 year olds was reduced to their backyard. Same kids who had miles of free reign and lament the loss of freedom were imposing the rules restricting freedom of their own kids.

I know I'm guilty of that to some degree as well. A lot of collective social pressure to be hyper aware of your kids whereabouts despite a lot of individuals thinking more independence would be better.

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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #48 on: July 29, 2015, 03:56:33 pm »
When I heard Biggio speak Sunday, I was reminded of that.  Every one of us played for one reason - because we loved it.  And as I said, it just astounds me that most kids just don't feel that way anymore.
That's a great memory.  I still have a baseball that my dad dated and labeled "first ball over fence".  I hit it off a tee in our backyard when I was about to start Memorial Ashford Little League t-ball.  We were the Dillos my first year, I still have the tshirt/jersey somewhere, last time I saw it it just looked shockingly small.

We lived on a cul-de-sac, so that was the neighborhood kids' diamond.  The people who owned the house in CF were very good sports about it, I imagine they were on good terms with the window replacement people.
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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #49 on: July 29, 2015, 03:57:37 pm »
People actually inspect each piece of candy?  I thought that was an urban myth, like not flicking your lights at drivers without headlights on because their aspiring gang members looking for their first kill.

The idea of malevolent strangers poisoning candy is. That hasn't stopped the organized mass hysteria though. It doesn't help around here that the one documented case of fatal Halloween candy poisoning I'm familiar with was here in Houston (or Deer park, actually) in the mid-70s, so those of a certain age were sort of traumatized accordingly.
The rules of distinction were thrown out with the baseball cap.  It does not lend itself to protocol.  It is found today on youth in homes, classrooms, even in fine restaurants.  Regardless of its other consequences, this is a breach against civility.  A civilized man should avoid this mania.

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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #50 on: July 29, 2015, 04:12:47 pm »
Just heard some guy on the radio who did a study of kids' independence about 40 years ago then followed up to see how the next generation of those same kids were treated. Guy said the town was largely unchanged and, if anything, safer than before. Kids free range was reduced significantly despite no increase in risk.

Miles of free reign for teenagers was reduced to blocks. Blocks of free range for 5-7 year olds was reduced to their backyard. Same kids who had miles of free reign and lament the loss of freedom were imposing the rules restricting freedom of their own kids.

I know I'm guilty of that to some degree as well. A lot of collective social pressure to be hyper aware of your kids whereabouts despite a lot of individuals thinking more independence would be better.

Culture of Fear by Glassner is a very interesting book on the subject.

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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #51 on: July 29, 2015, 04:52:29 pm »
The idea of malevolent strangers poisoning candy is. That hasn't stopped the organized mass hysteria though. It doesn't help around here that the one documented case of fatal Halloween candy poisoning I'm familiar with was here in Houston (or Deer park, actually) in the mid-70s, so those of a certain age were sort of traumatized accordingly.

I get that the idea is a myth, but I didn't realize people really take the action of inspecting candy in response to it.  I figured everyone is aware of how silly that is.  I guess I give society too much credit.
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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #52 on: July 29, 2015, 05:08:32 pm »
Once certain risks get into the imagination it is hard to get rid of them. Good luck to the politicians who try to unwind the TSA.

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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #53 on: July 29, 2015, 05:32:15 pm »
The idea of malevolent strangers poisoning candy is. That hasn't stopped the organized mass hysteria though. It doesn't help around here that the one documented case of fatal Halloween candy poisoning I'm familiar with was here in Houston (or Deer park, actually) in the mid-70s, so those of a certain age were sort of traumatized accordingly.
I'm almost certain that is the only case. It was a father poisoning his own son for the insurance money. It has destroyed trick-or-treating everywhere in the country.
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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #54 on: July 29, 2015, 06:51:05 pm »
I'm almost certain that is the only case. It was a father poisoning his own son for the insurance money. It has destroyed trick-or-treating everywhere in the country.

He also tried to poison his daughter and a couple of the neighbor kids to cover his tracts (with cyanide-laced pixie sticks).  His son was the only one who them. 
The rules of distinction were thrown out with the baseball cap.  It does not lend itself to protocol.  It is found today on youth in homes, classrooms, even in fine restaurants.  Regardless of its other consequences, this is a breach against civility.  A civilized man should avoid this mania.

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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #55 on: July 29, 2015, 06:56:48 pm »
I get that the idea is a myth, but I didn't realize people really take the action of inspecting candy in response to it.  I figured everyone is aware of how silly that is.  I guess I give society too much credit.

It's encouraged at the highest levels:

http://www.fda.gov/Food/ResourcesForYou/Consumers/ucm187021.htm

Some offer x-ray services, although there's never been one single case of a needle or razor blade or other foreign object imbedded.

http://news.nationalpost.com/news/halloween-candy-x-rays-offered-as-free-service-at-some-u-s-clinics
The rules of distinction were thrown out with the baseball cap.  It does not lend itself to protocol.  It is found today on youth in homes, classrooms, even in fine restaurants.  Regardless of its other consequences, this is a breach against civility.  A civilized man should avoid this mania.

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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #56 on: July 30, 2015, 08:11:20 am »
I blame it all on parents wanting to relive their childhoods through their own children's lives. Let kids be kids. Play all of the sports instead of this incessant and frankly dangerous sport specialization and travel teams, etc. This helicopter parenting hasn't produced anything but neurotic parents and burned out children. I'm glad that my parents allowed me to individuate on my pace. I owe them immeasurably for that.
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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #57 on: July 31, 2015, 12:39:24 am »
I blame it all on parents wanting to relive their childhoods through their own children's lives. Let kids be kids. Play all of the sports instead of this incessant and frankly dangerous sport specialization and travel teams, etc. This helicopter parenting hasn't produced anything but neurotic parents and burned out children. I'm glad that my parents allowed me to individuate on my pace. I owe them immeasurably for that.

My experience too.
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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #58 on: July 31, 2015, 08:42:47 am »
I blame it all on parents wanting to relive their childhoods through their own children's lives. Let kids be kids. Play all of the sports instead of this incessant and frankly dangerous sport specialization and travel teams, etc. This helicopter parenting hasn't produced anything but neurotic parents and burned out children. I'm glad that my parents allowed me to individuate on my pace. I owe them immeasurably for that.

The saddest part of all this, for me, is ... it is my generation (as parents) who started all this bullshit.

We grew up in the 1960s and 1970s and had, arguably, the free-est, must unencumbered, most fun childhoods imaginable; in the history of mankind, even. And then we turned around and locked down our own children.

I'll never understand it.
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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #59 on: July 31, 2015, 08:58:04 am »
The saddest part of all this, for me, is ... it is my generation (as parents) who started all this bullshit.

We grew up in the 1960s and 1970s and had, arguably, the free-est, must unencumbered, most fun childhoods imaginable; in the history of mankind, even. And then we turned around and locked down our own children.

I'll never understand it.

Maybe it was because we knew what we got away with and didn't want that for our kids?

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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #60 on: July 31, 2015, 09:10:22 am »
Maybe it was because we knew what we got away with and didn't want that for our kids?

Maybe.

Another irony, at least in my own example, is we were generally way more laid back and worldly and "understanding" of our kids than I remember our traditional Depression-era born parents being. Us, the ones who fucked everything up for our kids.

While meanwhile, our traditional, 'uptight' parents quietly understood the value of just letting children play, and even wander a little, and work things out in the neighborhood, mostly by themselves.

Go figure.
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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #61 on: July 31, 2015, 09:38:14 am »
The saddest part of all this, for me, is ... it is my generation (as parents) who started all this bullshit.

We grew up in the 1960s and 1970s and had, arguably, the free-est, must unencumbered, most fun childhoods imaginable; in the history of mankind, even. And then we turned around and locked down our own children.

I'll never understand it.

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Re: Biggio's Speech
« Reply #62 on: July 31, 2015, 09:40:35 am »
Maybe it was because we knew what we got away with and didn't want that for our kids?

There's some truth to that.
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