Author Topic: Books (2018)  (Read 2056 times)

Knoxbanedoodle

  • Fantasy Team Owner
  • Should Have Quit 500 Posts Ago
  • Posts: 2305
    • View Profile
Books (2018)
« on: May 26, 2018, 11:17:06 am »
It's been a terrific year already for books over here so I thought, why not?

Just finished Grace, by the Irish novelist Paul Lynch. Takes place during the potato famine. Extraordinary prose, a bit challenging at first, very idiosyncratic. I think you'd classify it a bildungsroman.

Finished the Mars trilogy by Kim Stanley Robinson this year. This is hard sci-fi, but KSR is so smart and intellectually widespread and such a good writer it doesn't feel geeky. (His Shaman from a few years back is one of the best novels I've ever read--it was inspired by Werner Herzog's documentary Cave of Forgotten Dreams about 45,000 year-old cave paintings in northern France, and so far every one I've turned on to it has loved it--and been surprised by it--as well. KSR rules.) Blue Mars wasn't the book its predecessors (Red Mars and Green Mars) were, but I'm so glad I read the trilogy. Really makes one think about new beginnings, and though he wrote them in the 90s they seem particularly of the moment right now.

Our book club's read Future Home of the Living God by Louise Erdrich and The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead so far this year. The former I put down in exasperation a third of the way through. The latter I finished and found very thought-provoking, though probably not always in ways Whitehead intended. It was good but the Pulitzer and the National Book Award?

I'm really excited about two books I just started: The Overstory by Richard Powers and Farewell to the Horse by Ulrich Raulff. The Overstory is actually about trees. A sprawling novel that took like four pages to change the way I see the world. Pretty sure I'm going to have to read all the Richard Powers books now. And Farewell is a perhaps unclassifiable history of the end of the era of horses. (In the intro he references a fellow historian who separated human history into three eras: before horses, horses, after horses.) It promises to be incredible. Raulff and Powers both have astonishing brains, and it's fun to binge on horses and trees at the same time.

The quantum leap in my life this year has been discovering that I prefer listening to audio books while at the gym than music/podcasts, and that I prefer listening to audio books in the car than music, and that absolutely anything (especially an audio book) is preferable to listening to the news. So I listened to Mary Renault's Alexander trilogy and am two and a half books into Tana French's Dublin Murder Squad series. The Renault was a revelation. Really lush historical fiction with serious plotting excellence and crystalline characterization. I feel like the third book might have served as a specific inspiration for Game of Thrones. The second was terrific, if a bit too eunuchy, and the first I just flat adored. Oliver Stone's amazingly terrible Alexander was based on these beautiful books. Tana French was recommended to me by my sister in Austin. The first book (Into the Woods) was so-so, the second (The Likeness) I loved, and so far the third (Faithful Place) is the best yet.

Let's see, what else?

Oh yeah, read Tim Kreider's second book of essays, I Wrote this Book Because I love You. His first book, We Learn Nothing, stands as one of my favorite exposes of a fellow human mind. This one I liked a lot but you can't ever have first love again, I guess. Where the first was variously about his friendships, politics, aging, love, sex and family, this one is almost exclusively about women he's been with. And it doesn't have any of his brilliant cartoons 'cause I guess he doesn't want to do cartoons anymore. Oh well. C'est la vie. It's still a book filled with jewel-like essays.

austro

  • Fantasy Team Owner
  • Illuminati
  • Posts: 18957
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #1 on: May 26, 2018, 06:17:02 pm »
Thanks for the recommendations. We leave tomorrow for our quasi-annual trip to Colorado for the JUCO World Series, so I'll download a couple of these for reading on the plane and between games.
I remember all the good times me 'n Miller enjoyed
Up and down the M1 in some luminous yo-yo toy
But the future has to change - and to change I've got to destroy
Oh look out Lennon here I come - land ahoy-hoy-hoy

Fredia

  • Pope
  • Posts: 6842
  • Looking forward
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #2 on: May 27, 2018, 08:59:15 am »
already have book one of the red trilogy on hold at the library. I love science fiction..and have a particular weakness for bad science fiction movies.
forever is composed entirely of nows

Waldo

  • Administrator
  • Pope
  • Posts: 6123
    • View Profile
    • http://www.ashrubbery.com/
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #3 on: May 28, 2018, 11:42:03 am »
I read Red Mars a long time ago.  Been thinking about rereading it as well as the rest of the series but some of the Amazon reviews have kept me away thus far.

Other sci-fi stuff I've read this year:

- I've started reading the Expanse novels before I dive into the TV show.  I'm about 1/4 of the way through the second book and it's good reading.
- If you like military sci-fi then the Frontlines series by Marko Kloos is a page-turner.  Heavily influenced by Starship Troopers but it actually has a plot.
- The Silo series by Hugh Howey is another good one.  Late last year Howey released "Machine Learning", a collection of short stories which is worth the price of admission by itself, but it also includes an epilogue to the Silo series.

Knoxbanedoodle

  • Fantasy Team Owner
  • Should Have Quit 500 Posts Ago
  • Posts: 2305
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #4 on: May 28, 2018, 11:47:12 am »
I read Red Mars a long time ago.  Been thinking about rereading it as well as the rest of the series but some of the Amazon reviews have kept me away thus far.

Other sci-fi stuff I've read this year:

- I've started reading the Expanse novels before I dive into the TV show.  I'm about 1/4 of the way through the second book and it's good reading.
- If you like military sci-fi then the Frontlines series by Marko Kloos is a page-turner.  Heavily influenced by Starship Troopers but it actually has a plot.
- The Silo series by Hugh Howey is another good one.  Late last year Howey released "Machine Learning", a collection of short stories which is worth the price of admission by itself, but it also includes an epilogue to the Silo series.

Oh man, I don't know how you stopped after Red Mars. I think Green Mars was just killer. Surprised to hear that about the reviews.

I haven't read a lot of sci-fi since my Philip K. Dick days in high school, but last year the movie Arrival encouraged me to go buy the book of Ted Chiang's short stories and I'm really glad I did. Very erudite, very different.

That's good to hear about the Expanse books. A friend of mine is big into those too, so that settles it for me.

MusicMan

  • High Order of the Ferret
  • *****
  • Posts: 25724
  • Thanks for 2015
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #5 on: May 28, 2018, 05:10:28 pm »
I can’t figure why Arrival didn’t get more love. Beautiful story and movie.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I believe there ought to be a constitutional amendment outlawing AstroTurf and the designated hitter. I believe in the sweet spot, soft-core pornography, opening your presents Christmas morning rather than Christmas Eve and I believe in long, slow, deep, torture of Bud Selig.

austro

  • Fantasy Team Owner
  • Illuminati
  • Posts: 18957
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #6 on: May 28, 2018, 07:07:23 pm »
I can’t figure why Arrival didn’t get more love. Beautiful story and movie.

No giant robots transforming into 120db weapons of death.
I remember all the good times me 'n Miller enjoyed
Up and down the M1 in some luminous yo-yo toy
But the future has to change - and to change I've got to destroy
Oh look out Lennon here I come - land ahoy-hoy-hoy

Col. Sphinx Drummond

  • Fantasy Team Owner
  • Illuminati
  • Posts: 16032
  • art is a bulwark against the irrationality of man
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #7 on: May 28, 2018, 07:13:48 pm »
No giant robots transforming into 120db weapons of death.
Female lead.
Everyone's talking, few of them know
The rest are pretending, they put on a show
And if there's a message I guess this is it
Truth isn't easy, the easy part's shit

Fredia

  • Pope
  • Posts: 6842
  • Looking forward
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #8 on: May 28, 2018, 07:22:54 pm »
off topic kinda but does anyone remember sitting in the theater and seeing that giant space ship go across the screen for the first time in the original star wars
forever is composed entirely of nows

WVastro

  • Should Have Quit 500 Posts Ago
  • Posts: 2059
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #9 on: May 28, 2018, 08:17:35 pm »
No giant robots transforming into 120db weapons of death.

Only one explosion and it’s mostly off-screen.

Bench

  • Illuminati
  • Posts: 16262
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #10 on: May 29, 2018, 10:49:41 am »
I'm just finishing up Brave Genius by Sean Carroll.  It's a meticulously researched account of two future Nobel prize winners' (Albert Camus and biologist Jacques Monod) efforts in the French resistance during WWII and their friendship and careers following the war.  I highly recommend it.
"Holy shit, Mozart. Get me off this fucking thing."

VirtualBob

  • Pope
  • Posts: 5540
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #11 on: June 04, 2018, 09:19:37 am »
I will toss in a vote for Crisis of Responsibility by David Bahnsen - an analysis of our addiction to political blame and victim Hood that is sure to "trigger" people on all sides. Great book.
Up in the Air

drew corleone

  • Should Have Quit 500 Posts Ago
  • Posts: 2447
    • View Profile
    • http://2centmovies.blogspot.com
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #12 on: June 07, 2018, 09:07:43 pm »
That's impressive. I'm usually good for 5-6 books a year, and my reading list is already longer than I'm likely to get to in the next decade, but I set a goal of 5K pages or 12 books for 2018. 40% of the way through the year I am at... about 1,000 pages, and only two books read (and one of those was re-reading Ready Player One before I saw the movie).

Waldo

  • Administrator
  • Pope
  • Posts: 6123
    • View Profile
    • http://www.ashrubbery.com/
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #13 on: July 11, 2018, 07:15:22 am »
Ben Reiter’s “Astroball” dropped yesterday and I started on it last night. I’m only a couple chapters in but it is well written so far.

Gizzmonic

  • Key Member of the Conspiracy
  • Posts: 4569
  • Space City Carbohydrate
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #14 on: August 05, 2018, 09:37:32 am »
I just read through The pope who would be king  by David Kertzer. Fascinating historical drama that has autocratic theocracy (Catholic Church/Papal States) reacting against the emergence of Italian nationalism/republicanism in the mid-19th century.
Grab another Coke and let's die

subnuclear

  • Pope
  • Posts: 5994
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #15 on: August 05, 2018, 03:23:57 pm »
Bad Blood is as good as everyone says it is.

I read Victor Davis Hanson's Second World War book earlier this year. It was very practical and big picture and pretty fresh despite there being a huge amount of WWII stuff out there.

Knoxbanedoodle

  • Fantasy Team Owner
  • Should Have Quit 500 Posts Ago
  • Posts: 2305
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #16 on: September 26, 2018, 05:06:40 pm »
So, finished The Overstory by Richard Powers--it was great. Big-hearted, smart, thought provoking, sciency, well-plotted and very often beautiful.

Also listened to the first book of the Chinese sci-fi sensation Three Body Problem by Cixin Liu (or Liu Cixin, I forget which way it goes). If I continue this it will be on the page, as the reader of the Audible version drove me fucking nuts the entire time. Pretty cool idea for a book, though: I don't think I'll give anything away by saying it involves the contact by the Chinese of an alien species in rather desperate straits to find a new home planet.

Then for something completely different I listened to The Corrections, which I highly recommend. (Not just the book but also the listening to it, as the reader [George Guidal, maybe?] was magnificent. Apparently he's the Cy Young of audiobook narrators.) This of course is the novel that put Jonathan Franzen on the larger map and occasioned his brilliant kerfuffle with Oprah. I'd listened to a few interviews of the guy and been put off by academic acquaintances who knew and didn't warm to him, and also had some silly resentment of him because he'd been anointed back when bookworld still anointed young white dudes (probably he was the last white dude bookworld will anoint for a while), but the book was just great. The poet, they say, is the person who knows the name of the flower, the name of the color. Franzen knows all the names and knows how the systems work. Capable hands to carry you sweepingly through a midwestern family's fraught moment during the Clinton prosperity. I at once moved on to his follow-up effort, Freedom.

Also now reading The Goldfinch, my first Donna Tartt novel, won the Pulitzer Prize a couple years ago. It's fun so far though I've had a hard time with her conception of a 13-year-old-boy, but viva la difference, no?


Waldo

  • Administrator
  • Pope
  • Posts: 6123
    • View Profile
    • http://www.ashrubbery.com/
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #17 on: September 27, 2018, 08:45:03 am »
I picked up Space Team for $0.99 a few months back and started reading it recently.  The book really isn't all that great, but it has one of the best opening paragraphs I've ever read:

Quote
Cal Carver's last day on Earth started badly, improved momentarily, then rapidly went downhill.  It began with him being sentenced to two years in prison, and ended with the annihilation of two thirds of the human race.  Somewhere in between, there was a somewhat enjoyable moment when he ate a lemon drop, but otherwise it was a pretty grim twenty-four hours all around.

Limey

  • Contributor
  • High Order of the Ferret
  • *****
  • Posts: 31519
  • Tally Ho!
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #18 on: September 27, 2018, 09:01:21 am »
I picked up Space Team for $0.99 a few months back and started reading it recently.  The book really isn't all that great, but it has one of the best opening paragraphs I've ever read:

If you haven't read "The Martian", I strongly recommend doing do.  The movie got categorised as a comedy because the book is so damn funny.  Gallows humor is rife, along with nerdly musings and moments of genuine peril and tension.

The opening line of the book:

"I'm so fucked."
« Last Edit: September 27, 2018, 09:04:22 am by Limey »
Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak; courage is also what it takes to sit down and listen.

MusicMan

  • High Order of the Ferret
  • *****
  • Posts: 25724
  • Thanks for 2015
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #19 on: September 27, 2018, 09:08:56 am »
If you haven't read "The Martian", I strongly recommend doing do.  The movie got categorised as a comedy because the book is so damn funny.  Gallows humor is rife, along with nerdly musings and moments of genuine peril and tension.

The opening line of the book:

"I'm so fucked."

This is absolutely co-signed, but spare yourself his follow up, “Artemis”.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
I believe there ought to be a constitutional amendment outlawing AstroTurf and the designated hitter. I believe in the sweet spot, soft-core pornography, opening your presents Christmas morning rather than Christmas Eve and I believe in long, slow, deep, torture of Bud Selig.

Dark Star

  • Veteran Role Player
  • Posts: 481
  • Stella Obscura
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #20 on: September 28, 2018, 07:53:19 am »
If you haven't read "The Martian", I strongly recommend doing do.  The movie got categorised as a comedy because the book is so damn funny.  Gallows humor is rife, along with nerdly musings and moments of genuine peril and tension.

The opening line of the book:

"I'm so fucked."

It's not "Call me Ishmael," but I like it.
Shall we go, you and I, while we can,
Through the transitive nightfall of diamonds?

Knoxbanedoodle

  • Fantasy Team Owner
  • Should Have Quit 500 Posts Ago
  • Posts: 2305
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #21 on: September 28, 2018, 08:34:05 am »
It's not "Call me Ishmael," but I like it.

Off the top of my head I can’t think of a better antonym for The Martian than Moby Dick.

BizidyDizidy

  • Pope
  • Posts: 8809
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #22 on: September 28, 2018, 01:35:42 pm »
Highly recommend finishing 3 Body Problem - the first book is good, but the full trilogy is excellent
"My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four. Unless there are three other people."
  -  Orson Welles

austro

  • Fantasy Team Owner
  • Illuminati
  • Posts: 18957
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #23 on: September 28, 2018, 08:35:22 pm »
Highly recommend finishing 3 Body Problem - the first book is good, but the full trilogy is excellent

Thanks, I hadn't heard of it before yesterday. It sounded interesting, and I'm glad to see a recommendation. I'll give it a try.
I remember all the good times me 'n Miller enjoyed
Up and down the M1 in some luminous yo-yo toy
But the future has to change - and to change I've got to destroy
Oh look out Lennon here I come - land ahoy-hoy-hoy

das

  • Key Member of the Conspiracy
  • Posts: 3274
    • View Profile
    • Faith Home Ministries
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #24 on: September 29, 2018, 12:00:15 pm »
It's not "Call me Ishmael," but I like it.

Incoming thread hijack:  yours and @Limey’s comment about best/great opening lines in a book got me thinking on the long drive to Vermont last night. What’s the best opening line of a song?

I settled on the first line from The Smiths / How Soon is Now:  “I am the son and the heir of a shyness that is criminally vulgar”.
Another trenchant comment by a jealous lesser intellect.

Knoxbanedoodle

  • Fantasy Team Owner
  • Should Have Quit 500 Posts Ago
  • Posts: 2305
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #25 on: September 29, 2018, 12:50:06 pm »
Incoming thread hijack:  yours and @Limey’s comment about best/great opening lines in a book got me thinking on the long drive to Vermont last night. What’s the best opening line of a song?

I settled on the first line from The Smiths / How Soon is Now:  “I am the son and the heir of a shyness that is criminally vulgar”.

Yeah, I think Morrissey lyrics would do pretty well on that list. "We hate it when our friends become successful..."

Col. Sphinx Drummond

  • Fantasy Team Owner
  • Illuminati
  • Posts: 16032
  • art is a bulwark against the irrationality of man
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #26 on: September 29, 2018, 01:05:27 pm »
I always loved the way Morrisey gets straight to the point.
Everyone's talking, few of them know
The rest are pretending, they put on a show
And if there's a message I guess this is it
Truth isn't easy, the easy part's shit

Col. Sphinx Drummond

  • Fantasy Team Owner
  • Illuminati
  • Posts: 16032
  • art is a bulwark against the irrationality of man
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #27 on: September 29, 2018, 01:18:50 pm »
Yeah, I think Morrissey lyrics would do pretty well on that list. "We hate it when our friends become successful..."
Girlfriend in a coma, I know - I know, it serious.
I was happy in the haze of a drunken hour, but heaven knows I'm miserable now.
The more you ignore me, the closer I get.
Sweetness, sweetness I was only joking when I said I'd like to smash every tooth in your head
Everyone's talking, few of them know
The rest are pretending, they put on a show
And if there's a message I guess this is it
Truth isn't easy, the easy part's shit

das

  • Key Member of the Conspiracy
  • Posts: 3274
    • View Profile
    • Faith Home Ministries
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #28 on: September 29, 2018, 02:28:56 pm »
Girlfriend in a coma, I know - I know, it serious.
I was happy in the haze of a drunken hour, but heaven knows I'm miserable now.
The more you ignore me, the closer I get.
Sweetness, sweetness I was only joking when I said I'd like to smash every tooth in your head

“The pain was enough to make a shy, bald Buddhist reflect and plan a mass murder...”
Another trenchant comment by a jealous lesser intellect.

Bench

  • Illuminati
  • Posts: 16262
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #29 on: September 29, 2018, 03:15:47 pm »
“The pain was enough to make a shy, bald Buddhist reflect and plan a mass murder...”

What did the Buddhist monk say to the hot dog vendor?



"Make me one with everything."
"Holy shit, Mozart. Get me off this fucking thing."

Knoxbanedoodle

  • Fantasy Team Owner
  • Should Have Quit 500 Posts Ago
  • Posts: 2305
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #30 on: December 28, 2018, 02:48:54 pm »
Wrapping up the year in reading:

Listened to Franzen's Freedom--very good, not great; started listening to Neal Stephenson's Quicksilver (the first in his Baroque trilogy and a book I'd picked up with enthusiasm after the nonpareil Cryptonomicon but put down with what is to me today inexplicable disappointment way back in 2003 or something...it's really good); listened to several more Tana French Dublin Murder Squad novels (Faithful Place was wonderful, Broken Harbor not my cuppa), bought the sequel to the Three Body Problem, listened to Kim Stanley Robinson's New York 2140 and cracked open his Aurora, also John Powys's medieval epic Porius, Franzen's Purity, a non-fiction book about the historical Merlin, started and put-down Richard Powers's Galatea 2.2 (cool but too frequently impenetrable), listened to Joe Hill's pretty fucking excellent horror novel NOS4A2 ("Nosferatu", enthusiastically narrated by Kate Mulgrew, who Limey's got a probable crush on--Joe Hill is Stephen King's son), and started The World As It Is, by the former Obama foreign policy staffer, which promises to be incredible and depressing beyond belief. 

Good year in reading!

austro

  • Fantasy Team Owner
  • Illuminati
  • Posts: 18957
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #31 on: December 28, 2018, 03:11:13 pm »
...; started listening to Neal Stephenson's Quicksilver (the first in his Baroque trilogy and a book I'd picked up with enthusiasm after the nonpareil Cryptonomicon but put down with what is to me today inexplicable disappointment way back in 2003 or something...it's really good); ...

I can understand why some people get turned off by the length and seeming meandering of some of Stepehenson's work, but I sure enjoy it. I just started on Anathem, and I'm excited to see where it goes.
I remember all the good times me 'n Miller enjoyed
Up and down the M1 in some luminous yo-yo toy
But the future has to change - and to change I've got to destroy
Oh look out Lennon here I come - land ahoy-hoy-hoy

Ty in Tampa

  • Contributor
  • Pope
  • Posts: 8787
  • You just gotta keep livin' man, L-I-V-I-N
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #32 on: December 29, 2018, 03:37:19 pm »
What did the Buddhist monk say to the hot dog vendor?



"Make me one with everything."

Buddhist monk hands the hot dog vendor a 20. When he gets nothing back, the monk asks for his change. Vendor says, “Change comes from within.”
"You want me broken. You want me dead.
I'm living rent-free in the back of your head."

MusicMan

  • High Order of the Ferret
  • *****
  • Posts: 25724
  • Thanks for 2015
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #33 on: December 29, 2018, 04:50:24 pm »
Buddhist monk hands the hot dog vendor a 20. When he gets nothing back, the monk asks for his change. Vendor says, “Change comes from within.”

A Buddhist monk went to an A’s game just to hear the sound of one hand clapping.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I believe there ought to be a constitutional amendment outlawing AstroTurf and the designated hitter. I believe in the sweet spot, soft-core pornography, opening your presents Christmas morning rather than Christmas Eve and I believe in long, slow, deep, torture of Bud Selig.

Astros Fan in Big D

  • Pope
  • Posts: 8234
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #34 on: December 29, 2018, 08:15:28 pm »
'God Save Texas' by Lawrence Wright was enjoyable.

He wrote 'Going Clear'; highly recommend that title as well.


And keep the Buddhist jokes rolling.

Lefty

  • Key Member of the Conspiracy
  • Posts: 3178
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #35 on: December 30, 2018, 12:02:55 pm »
Finally got around to reading "The Son", what a fantastic book.  Philip Meyer's first novel, "American Rust", is also excellent.
You may ask yourself, "How do I work this?"

VirtualBob

  • Pope
  • Posts: 5540
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #36 on: December 31, 2018, 07:58:28 am »
Life After Google was a great read.
Up in the Air

juliogotay

  • Pope
  • Posts: 8580
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #37 on: January 01, 2019, 08:49:50 am »
'God Save Texas' by Lawrence Wright was enjoyable.

He wrote 'Going Clear'; highly recommend that title as well.


And keep the Buddhist jokes rolling.

A few years ago I read that Wright was part of a semi-regular breakfast group in Austin which included Stephen Harrigan, S.C. Gwynne and the U.T. History professor/author H.W. Brands. Oh, to be a fly on the wall.

Fredia

  • Pope
  • Posts: 6842
  • Looking forward
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #38 on: January 01, 2019, 09:33:43 am »
agreed tried to read it twice
forever is composed entirely of nows

Knoxbanedoodle

  • Fantasy Team Owner
  • Should Have Quit 500 Posts Ago
  • Posts: 2305
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #39 on: January 01, 2019, 10:12:03 am »
A few years ago I read that Wright was part of a semi-regular breakfast group in Austin which included Stephen Harrigan, S.C. Gwynne and the U.T. History professor/author H.W. Brands. Oh, to be a fly on the wall.

Wright is a family friend of ours. College roommate of my uncle. I haven't met him but he's allegedly just as great as you'd think. And my dad took Brands out to lunch several years ago, not long after his TR biography. My dad said, "it's easy to forget how professorial professors can be."

Astros Fan in Big D

  • Pope
  • Posts: 8234
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #40 on: January 01, 2019, 01:17:25 pm »
A few years ago I read that Wright was part of a semi-regular breakfast group in Austin which included Stephen Harrigan, S.C. Gwynne and the U.T. History professor/author H.W. Brands. Oh, to be a fly on the wall.

He mentioned that breakfast group a few times in the book.   Even told of Karl Rove crashing it once and shooting the political breeze with them.

subnuclear

  • Pope
  • Posts: 5994
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #41 on: January 01, 2019, 01:54:51 pm »
Weird, I just watched the documentary “Three Identical Strangers” which features Wright prominently. Interesting guy I guess.

juliogotay

  • Pope
  • Posts: 8580
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #42 on: January 01, 2019, 03:00:46 pm »
He mentioned that breakfast group a few times in the book.   Even told of Karl Rove crashing it once and shooting the political breeze with them.

did he mention where they met for breakfast?

Astros Fan in Big D

  • Pope
  • Posts: 8234
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #43 on: January 02, 2019, 12:08:11 am »
did he mention where they met for breakfast?

I just looked it up on the kindle app; he doesn't mention the location,  just that it's on Monday mornings.

juliogotay

  • Pope
  • Posts: 8580
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #44 on: January 02, 2019, 07:56:42 am »
I just looked it up on the kindle app; he doesn't mention the location,  just that it's on Monday mornings.

Thanks for the effort. I guess I won't be stalking them. My first guess would be Cisco's as that seems like such a literary thing to do.
« Last Edit: January 02, 2019, 07:58:23 am by juliogotay »

Bench

  • Illuminati
  • Posts: 16262
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #45 on: January 02, 2019, 09:49:50 am »
Thanks for the effort. I guess I won't be stalking them. My first guess would be Cisco's as that seems like such a literary thing to do.

Sweetish Hill Bakery on west 6th.
"Holy shit, Mozart. Get me off this fucking thing."

juliogotay

  • Pope
  • Posts: 8580
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #46 on: January 02, 2019, 09:54:21 am »
Sweetish Hill Bakery on west 6th.

Is this a guess or "for the win"?

Bench

  • Illuminati
  • Posts: 16262
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #47 on: January 02, 2019, 09:56:32 am »
Is this a guess or "for the win"?

An oat bran muffin for Wright and a croissant for Harrigan. Brands and Curtis have usually eaten already, so they just order tea.

(According to this article)
« Last Edit: January 02, 2019, 09:59:54 am by Bench »
"Holy shit, Mozart. Get me off this fucking thing."

juliogotay

  • Pope
  • Posts: 8580
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #48 on: January 02, 2019, 10:32:13 am »
An oat bran muffin for Wright and a croissant for Harrigan. Brands and Curtis have usually eaten already, so they just order tea.

(According to this article)

Thanks for sharing, Bench.

Fredia

  • Pope
  • Posts: 6842
  • Looking forward
    • View Profile
Re: Books (2018)
« Reply #49 on: January 02, 2019, 10:39:44 am »
if  you  want to mess  with your  mind read peter clines 14 and  the fold  in that  order
forever is composed entirely of nows